Snow and the Seven Teenagers by Julia Keanini – Review

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Snow and the Seven Teenagers

by Julia Keanini

Published by Pickled Plum Publishing
Publication Date September 25th 2017
Snow and the Seven Teenagers by Julia Keanini – Review Genres: Clean Romance, Fairy Tale Retelling
Setting: Carolinas Contemporary
Main Character Ages: 35-60
Written for: Adult
Pages: 266

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Synopsis:

What happens when happily ever after is ruined?

Widow, Snow Meyers, was forced to quickly mend her brokenness following her husband's sudden death for the sake of her twin boys. With the passing years came moments of delight, even joy, but an attempt to get back into the world of dating has Snow reeling backwards. That one act reveals her still-tattered soul, that she isn't sure will ever be able to heal.

Business tycoon and billionaire, Grayson Prince, is haunted by one decision, one moment, that if he'd chosen differently would have altered his life and many others for the better. In an attempt to atone for his wrongs, he creates a league for teenage soccer players who would have been overlooked for college scholarships. The team he coaches happens to include Snow's sons.

Grayson and Snow are both sure that a real love is no longer attainable for them. But throw seven teenagers into the mix and maybe a happily ever after is possible?


Snow and the Seven Teenagers is a fun, clean romance.  It was a hard call on rating the story, though.  I was frequently distracted by errors, but there were so many great laugh-out-loud moments.  I decided that Grayson’s niece Vera alone made the story worthy of the higher of the ratings I vacillated between.

Ironically, this retelling of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs involved a woman who was not so tall and 7 large teenagers.  It was fun seeing their personalities come out in the story and try to match them to the various dwarfs of the fairy tale.

As I mentioned above, Grayson’s niece made the story.  She was a riot and very mature for her age.  Her solution to the need for an assistant coach was a blast.

The “poisoned apple” delivery was a surprise.  I thought the author was very creative in how she executed that key part of the story.  The resulting drama seemed a little hard to believe, though.

I have very mixed feelings about the source of Grayson’s “one decision, one moment” that haunted him.  Part of me says it is ridiculous that he would have felt responsible and even that he would have had to handle the press and repercussions of what happened (well, no mixed feelings about that – I just don’t get it), but part of me says that it was indicative of his character and tender heart.

This is the second book of the series, but it does stand alone.  There was a part of the book where the author spent quite a bit of time spelling out the various other couples and telling enough about them to indicate which fairy tale their lives resembled.  It was a little overdone and felt forced.  We either need to read the other stories or it wasn’t important for the author to cram that much information into that small portion of the book.

 

Posted October 22, 2017 by Phyllis Helton in Book Reviews / 0 Comments

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