The Major’s Daughter by Regina Jennings – Book Review, Preview

Posted December 19, 2019 by Phyllis Helton in Book Reviews /

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The Major’s Daughter by Regina Jennings – Book Review, Preview

The Major's Daughter

by Regina Jennings

four-half-stars
Series: Fort Reno #3
Published by Bethany House Publishers
Publication Date December 3, 2019
Genres: Historical Fiction, Christian Fiction, Western, Clean Romance
Setting: Oklahoma Gilded Age – US – 1875 – 1900
Main Character Ages: 18-24, 25-34
Written for: Adults
Pages: 331

Synopsis:

Caroline Adams returns to Indian Territory after tiring of confining society life. She wants adventure, and when she and her friend Amber come across swaggering outlaw Frisco Smith, they find his dreams for the new territory are very persuasive. With the much-anticipated land run pending, they may just join the rush.

Growing up parentless, all Frisco Smith wanted was a place to call his own. It's no wonder that he fought to open the Unassigned Lands. After years of sneaking across the border, he's even managed to put in a dugout house on a hidden piece of property he's poised to claim.

When the gun sounds, everyone's best plans are thrown out the window in the chaos of the run. Caroline and Frisco soon find themselves battling over a claim--and both dig in their heels. Settling the rightful ownership will bring these two closer than they ever expected and change their ideas of what a true home looks like.

I would like to thank Bethany House Publishers, Netgalley for giving me a copy of this book. This gift did not influence my opinion or review.


Also in this series: Holding the Fort, The Lieutenant's Bargain

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What a delightful story!

I have been loving these Fort Reno books. They are my favorite kind of historicals – those that are jam-packed with historical facts surrounded by an engaging romance.

I’ve seen movies about the Oklahoma Land Rush and have been fascinated seeing the motivations of the various participants. But most end with the claiming of the land. The Major’s Daughter depicts the race itself and goes far beyond to the establishing of the territory, turning it into civilization. I loved learning about the rules, how the soldiers were not allowed to participate. And learning about the boomers and the sooners. But I loved most of all watching the prairie grow into cities and all the crazy things that occurred as strangers had to learn how to relate to one another in the midst of very unsettled circumstances. Even more fascinating was learning that most of the strange things that went on during the growing stages of the town had really happened and are recorded in historical documents.

Caroline’s father is none other than the major from Holding the Fort, which was my first book by Regina Jennings. She is a feisty young lady, having grown up at the remote fort with plenty of freedom. Her determination had her working hard at a task that would have daunted all but the strongest of people. She was also full of compassion and grace and was so quick to help others when she was aware of the need.

Frisco was so interesting! His childhood was spent in orphanages, workhouses, and finally, the streets. Yet he rose above his circumstances and was now determined to make a new life for himself in the new territory. His search for a home influenced his actions greatly. I loved seeing how diligently he sought justice. He was truly an honorable man.

There is a touch of a faith element to the story, though it is not very strong. While at one point, Caroline read scripture that convicted her, a little, there was not any mention of that being more than an uncomfortable feeling that she suppressed. The heart change she eventually had was not clearly linked to her faith, it was simply a gradual change that came about.

If you enjoy historical fiction and learning unexpected tidbits along the way, I recommend The Major’s Daughter.

Regina's The Major's Daughter Pinterest Board

(click here to go directly to the board on Pinterest)
  • The Major's Daughter - Caroline and Frisco are both racing for their dreams, but only one can win.
  • Lovely colourized photo from 1890.
  • old west cowboys | Frontiersman & Pioneers | Pinterest | Scouts ...
  • Oklahoma Land Run Monument The Oklahoma Land Run Monument is a series of giant bronze sculptures which depicts the Land Run of April 22nd, 1889 that opened Oklahoma, Indian Territory up to homesteading by settlers. The monument, which sits on the banks of the Bricktown Canal in Oklahoma City, depicts dozens of horses, wagons, soldiers, and cowboys in a race to settle the newly opened lands.
  • Oklahoma Land Run 1889  (This is where it started... not with me of course!)
  • The dug out on the river. (The Major's Daughter)
  • dug out by pictureapromise, via Flickr
  • Summer Gown (image 5) | 1880s | cotton, needlerun lace | Kerry Taylor Auctions | February 27, 2017
  • Walking dress, British, ca. 1883. Three pieces—bodice, bustle, skirt. Floral print in red, yellow, green, & white on powder blue cotton, trimmed with lace. Victoria & Albert Museum
  • Character Inspiration for Caroline Adams - The Major's Daughter
  • Aidan Turner - Character Inspiration for Frisco Smith in The Major's Daughter
  • Character Inspirations for Frisco Smith and Caroline Adams in The Major's Daughter.

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