The Pirate Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo – Review

Posted April 6, 2018 by Phyllis Helton in Book Reviews / 0 Comments

The Pirate Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo – Review

The Pirate Bride
by Kathleen Y'Barbo


Series: Daughters of the Mayflower #2
Published by Barbour Books
Publication Date April 1, 2018
Genres: Historical Fiction, Clean Romance, Action/Adventure
Setting: The Caribbean Colonial Era - US - 1607 - 1776
Main Character Ages: 11-14, 18-24, 35-60
Written for: Adults
Pages: 251

Synopsis:

Can a former privateer and a determined heiress find lost treasure in 1725?
 A brand new series for fans of all things related to history, romance, adventure, faith, and family trees.



Pasts Collide in New Orleans when a Treasure Goes Missing
The last time New Orleans attorney Jean-Luc Valmont saw Maribel Cordoba, a Spanish nobleman’s daughter, she was an eleven-year-old orphan perched in the riggings of his privateering vessel proving herself as the best lookout on his crew. Until the day his infamy caught up with them all and innocent lives were lost. Unsure why he survived but vowing to make something of the chance he was given, Jean-Luc has buried his past life so deep that no living person will ever find it—until a very much alive and very grown up Maribel Cordoba arrives on his doorstep and threatens all he now holds dear. 



Join the adventure as the Daughters of the Mayflower series continues with The Pirate Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo.



More to come in the Daughters of the Mayflower series:
The Mayflower Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse – set 1620 Atlantic Ocean (coming February 2018)
The Pirate Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo – set 1725 New Orleans (coming April 2018)
The Captured Bride by Michelle Griep – set 1760 during the French and Indian War (coming June 2018)
The Patriot Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse – set 1774 Philadelphia (coming August 2018) 
The Cumberland Bride by Shannon McNear – set 1794 on the Wilderness Road (coming October 2018)
The Liberty Bride by MaryLu Tyndall – set 1814 Baltimore (coming December 2018)

I would like to thank Netgalley for giving me this copy of the book. This gift did not influence my opinion or review.

Also in this series: The Mayflower Bride, The Captured Bride, The Patriot Bride, The Cumberland Bride

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Privateer, not pirate! At least that is what Captain Beaumont would tell you. The author explains that there is a fine line between the two, but not necessarily one big enough to keep either one from hanging if caught by the right person.

I loved this fun adventure that follows Maribel from the time she is just 11 years old, crossing the Atlantic with her father after the death of her mother and grandfather. It is on this journey that their ship is attacked by pirates, um, privateers, and she ends up spending the next two months on their ship, charming each of the men of the crew.

“Considering what I’ve heard, I’d agree, Miss Maribel.” He nodded toward the corridor ahead. “Now follow me or you’ll get lost. And remember you just decided you’d follow orders from now on.”

“Yes I did, Mr. Bennett, but I feel like I ought to warn you about me. See, what I decide to do and what I turn out to do is not always the same thing. So if I don’t follow orders very well right now, I would like you to know I will only get better at it the longer I keep trying. I’m working on it, but I’ve got a long way to go.”

Again he chuckled. “Miss Maribel, you and me both. You and me both.”

The characters in this book were wonderful! From the feisty and precocious, Maribel to the gentleman privateer, Jean, to the former slave, Mr. Bennett and the rest of the crew, each one was developed so well you couldn’t help but feel that you knew them. There were many twists and turns in this story, with many things not what they seemed.

This second installment of The Mayflower Brides series was a very enjoyable read. The common thread in these stories is one of family, allowing each book to stand by itself, though the first book was enjoyable as well, so it makes sense to read them all.

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