The Revisionary by Kristen J. Hogrefe – Review

Posted April 10, 2018 by Phyllis Helton in Book Reviews / 0 Comments

The Revisionary by Kristen J. Hogrefe – Review

The Revisionary
by Kristen Hogrefe


Series: The Rogues #1
Published by Write Integrity Press
Publication Date June 6, 2017
Genres: Dystopian, Christian Fiction
The Future
Main Character Ages: 18-24
Written for: High-School/Young Adult/Adults
Pages: 399

Synopsis:

A Revisionary rewrites the rules. A Rogue breaks them. Which one is she?

Nineteen-year-old Portia Abernathy accepts her Revisionary draft to the Crystal Globe with one goal: earn a Dome seat so she can amend the satellite rules and rescue her brother. Her plan derails when Head Gage Eliab brands her as a suspect in a campus Rogue attack, and in a quest to clear her name, she questions if the vigilante Brotherhood responsible might be fighting for a cause greater than itself, a cause championed by the last civilization. But the current leaders have obscured history’s pages, and if she dares to engage the past through her training technology, they might wipe her own memory as well.

Her shifting loyalties pit her against Luther Danforth, her Court Citizen ally who believes in reform, not revolution. Joining the Brotherhood makes a future with him impossible—and Portia must decide if it’s better to rewrite the rules or to break them.

I would like to thank Celebrate Lit for giving me this copy of the book. This gift did not influence my opinion or review.

Also in this series: The Revolutionary

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There are so many things to love about this book! Kristen Hogrefe is a new-to-me author.  I have now subscribed to her newsletter and am waiting anxiously for the third book in this series. . .

Portia’s perspective is the only one given in this narrative, which is perfect for the story. She is stronger than she thinks, despite the scoliosis that limits her activities. She manages to get into trouble her first night at the Dome, despite having done nothing wrong. Things just go downhill for her as she questions the things she is being taught.

I love the subtle way that the author used things that were wrong in this society to highlight really good things in ours. There were also historical lessons that taught as Portia was studying ancient documents in her classes.

The names of some of the characters were clever. The giant peacekeeping officer was named Gath, perhaps a nod to the Goliath that David fought. Portia’s erstwhile neighbor and friend, the boy who called her “Cotton” and listened to her riddles, Luther, who as an idealistic young man desired to reform the society from within. I can’t help but think his name came from Martin Luther, a man who attempted to do the same thing in the church.

When you read this story, take note of the section dividers, because there will be a surprise for you at the end if you are looking carefully. I have never seen an author do this before and thought it was a unique touch.

I have set one of the genres for the book to “Christian Fiction”. This story only gives the slightest of hints that there is anything spiritual in it, but it is clear that as the series progresses, there will be more Christian doctrine coming. In addition, this is a series where each book builds on the previous one, so for those who want to know, this is clearly a Christian series.

About Kristen Hogrefe

Kristen Hogrefe is a life-long learner and award-winning author of young adult fiction. Her desire to think truthfully and live daringly inspires her real life and fictional adventures. She also has the heart of an educator and mentor. She teaches secondary language arts for Alpha Omega Academy, is a motivational speaker for graduations, and enjoys presenting at writer’s conferences. Currently, she serves as the president of an online writing chapter through Word Weavers International and teaches on the faculty of Serious Writer Academy. A Florida girl at heart, Kristen says yes to most activities involving sunshine.

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